The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mark Twain, Part LV

Tom Sawyer

Every day on Daily Readers' Book Club we offer an article length section of a book until that book is done.  We are currently reading Mark Twain's The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.  This book will have 90 parts.

CHAPTER XXI

VACATION was approaching.  The schoolmaster, always severe, grew severer and more exacting than ever, for he wanted the school to make a good showing on "Examination" day.  His rod and his ferule were seldom idle now--at least among the smaller pupils.  Only the biggest boys, and young ladies of eighteen and twenty, escaped lashing.  Mr. Dobbins' lashings were very vigorous ones, too; for although he carried, under his wig, a perfectly bald and shiny head, he had only reached middle age, and there was no sign of feebleness in his muscle.  As the great day approached, all the tyranny that was in him came to the surface; he seemed to take a vindictive pleasure in punishing the least shortcomings.  The consequence was, that the smaller boys spent their days in terror and suffering and their nights in plotting revenge.  They threw away no opportunity to do the master a mischief.  But he kept ahead all the time.  The retribution that followed every vengeful success was so sweeping and majestic that the boys always retired from the field badly worsted.  At last they conspired together and hit upon a plan that promised a dazzling victory.  They swore in the sign-painter's boy, told him the scheme, and asked his help.  He had his own reasons for being delighted, for the master boarded in his father's family and had given the boy ample cause to hate him.  The master's wife would go on a visit to the country in a few days, and there would be nothing to interfere with the plan; the master always prepared himself for great occasions by getting pretty well fuddled, and the sign-painter's boy said that when the dominie had reached the proper condition on Examination Evening he would "manage the thing" while he napped in his chair; then he would have him awakened at the right time and hurried away to school.

In the fulness of time the interesting occasion arrived.  At eight in the evening the schoolhouse was brilliantly lighted, and adorned with wreaths and festoons of foliage and flowers.  The master sat throned in his great chair upon a raised platform, with his blackboard behind him. He was looking tolerably mellow.  Three rows of benches on each side and six rows in front of him were occupied by the dignitaries of the town and by the parents of the pupils.  To his left, back of the rows of citizens, was a spacious temporary platform upon which were seated the scholars who were to take part in the exercises of the evening; rows of small boys, washed and dressed to an intolerable state of discomfort; rows of gawky big boys; snowbanks of girls and young ladies clad in lawn and muslin and conspicuously conscious of their bare arms, their grandmothers' ancient trinkets, their bits of pink and blue ribbon and the flowers in their hair.  All the rest of the house was filled with non-participating scholars.

The exercises began.  A very little boy stood up and sheepishly recited, "You'd scarce expect one of my age to speak in public on the stage," etc.--accompanying himself with the painfully exact and spasmodic gestures which a machine might have used--supposing the machine to be a trifle out of order.  But he got through safely, though cruelly scared, and got a fine round of applause when he made his manufactured bow and retired.

A little shamefaced girl lisped, "Mary had a little lamb," etc., performed a compassion-inspiring curtsy, got her meed of applause, and sat down flushed and happy.

Tom Sawyer stepped forward with conceited confidence and soared into the unquenchable and indestructible "Give me liberty or give me death" speech, with fine fury and frantic gesticulation, and broke down in the middle of it.  A ghastly stage-fright seized him, his legs quaked under him and he was like to choke.  True, he had the manifest sympathy of the house but he had the house's silence, too, which was even worse than its sympathy.  The master frowned, and this completed the disaster.  Tom struggled awhile and then retired, utterly defeated.  There was a weak attempt at applause, but it died early.

"The Boy Stood on the Burning Deck" followed; also "The Assyrian Came Down," and other declamatory gems.  Then there were reading exercises, and a spelling fight.  The meagre Latin class recited with honor.  The prime feature of the evening was in order, now--original "compositions" by the young ladies.  Each in her turn stepped forward to the edge of the platform, cleared her throat, held up her manuscript (tied with dainty ribbon), and proceeded to read, with labored attention to "expression" and punctuation.  The themes were the same that had been illuminated upon similar occasions by their mothers before them, their grandmothers, and doubtless all their ancestors in the female line clear back to the Crusades. "Friendship" was one; "Memories of Other Days"; "Religion in History"; "Dream Land"; "The Advantages of Culture"; "Forms of Political Government Compared and Contrasted"; "Melancholy"; "Filial Love"; "Heart Longings," etc., etc.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is available from amazon.com.


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Avatar of FlossyFlossy
March 1st, 2013  11:20 AM

Wow, kids these days probably could not even pronounce some of these.