Arcadian Adventures with the Idle Rich, by Stephen Leacock, Part I

Stephen Leacock

Every day on Daily Readers' Book Club we offer an article length section of a book until that book is done.  We are currently reading Stephen Leacock's Arcadian Adventures with the Idle Rich.  This book will have 94 parts.

CONTENTS

I A Little Dinner with Mr. Lucullus Fyshe
II The Wizard of Finance
III The Arrested Philanthropy of Mr. Tomlinson
IV The Yahi-Bahi Oriental Society of Mrs. Rasselyer-Brown
V The Love Story of Mr. Peter Spillikins
VI The Rival Churches of St. Asaph and St. Osoph
VII The Ministrations of the Rev. Uttermust Dumfarthing
VIII The Great Fight for Clean Government

CHAPTER ONE: A Little Dinner with Mr. Lucullus Fyshe

The Mausoleum Club stands on the quietest corner of the best residential street in the City.  It is a Grecian building of white stone.  About it are great elm trees with birds--the most expensive kind of birds--singing in the branches.

The street in the softer hours of the morning has an almost reverential quiet.  Great motors move drowsily along it, with solitary chauffeurs returning at 10.30 after conveying the earlier of the millionaires to their downtown offices.  The sunlight flickers through the elm trees, illuminating expensive nurse-maids wheeling valuable children in little perambulators.  Some of the children are worth millions and millions.  In Europe, no doubt, you may see in the Unter den Linden avenue or the Champs Elysees a little prince or princess go past with a clattering military guard of honour.  But that is nothing.  It is not half so impressive, in the real sense, as what you may observe every morning on Plutoria Avenue beside the Mausoleum Club in the quietest part of the city.  Here you may see a little toddling princess in a rabbit suit who owns fifty distilleries in her own right.  There, in a lacquered perambulator, sails past a little hooded head that controls from its cradle an entire New Jersey corporation.  The United States attorney-general is suing her as she sits, in a vain attempt to make her dissolve herself into constituent companies.  Near by is a child of four, in a khaki suit, who represents the merger of two trunk-line railways.  You may meet in the flickered sunlight any number of little princes and princesses far more real than the poor survivals of Europe.  Incalculable infants wave their fifty-dollar ivory rattles in an inarticulate greeting to one another.  A million dollars of preferred stock laughs merrily in recognition of a majority control going past in a go-cart drawn by an imported nurse.  And through it all the sunlight falls through the elm trees, and the birds sing and the motors hum, so that the whole world as seen from the boulevard of Plutoria Avenue is the very pleasantest place imaginable.

Just below Plutoria Avenue, and parallel with it, the trees die out and the brick and stone of the City begins in earnest.  Even from the Avenue you see the tops of the sky-scraping buildings in the big commercial streets, and can hear or almost hear the roar of the elevated railway, earning dividends.  And beyond that again the City sinks lower, and is choked and crowded with the tangled streets and little houses of the slums.

In fact, if you were to mount to the roof of the Mausoleum Club itself on Plutoria Avenue you could almost see the slums from there.  But why should you?  And on the other hand, if you never went up on the roof, but only dined inside among the palm trees, you would never know that the slums existed which is much better.

There are broad steps leading up to the club, so broad and so agreeably covered with matting that the physical exertion of lifting oneself from one's motor to the door of the club is reduced to the smallest compass.  The richer members are not ashamed to take the steps one at a time, first one foot and then the other; and at tight money periods, when there is a black cloud hanging over the Stock Exchange, you may see each and every one of the members of the Mausoleum Club dragging himself up the steps after this fashion, his restless eyes filled with the dumb pathos of a man wondering where he can put his hand on half a million dollars.

But at gayer times, when there are gala receptions at the club, its steps are all buried under expensive carpet, soft as moss and covered over with a long pavilion of red and white awning to catch the snowflakes; and beautiful ladies are poured into the club by the motorful.  Then, indeed, it is turned into a veritable Arcadia; and for a beautiful pastoral scene, such as would have gladdened the heart of a poet who understood the cost of things, commend me to the Mausoleum Club on just such an evening.  Its broad corridors and deep recesses are filled with shepherdesses such as you never saw, dressed in beautiful shimmering gowns, and wearing feathers in their hair that droop off sideways at every angle known to trigonometry.  And there are shepherds, too, with broad white waistcoats and little patent leather shoes and heavy faces and congested cheeks.  And there is dancing and conversation among the shepherds and shepherdesses, with such brilliant flashes of wit and repartee about the rise in Wabash and the fall in Cement that the soul of Louis Quatorze would leap to hear it.  And later there is supper at little tables, when the shepherds and shepherdesses consume preferred stocks and gold-interest bonds in the shape of chilled champagne and iced asparagus, and great platefuls of dividends and special quarterly bonuses are carried to and fro in silver dishes by Chinese philosophers dressed up to look like waiters.


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5 comments

Profile photo of FlossyFlossy
January 9th, 2014  11:45 AM

So we get to do some rich bashing for the next couple of months. I’m all for it.